Tizard Agreement

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The U.S. Congress had many supporters of neutrality for the United States, so there were other obstacles to cooperation. Tizard decided that the most productive approach would simply be to provide information and use America`s production capacity. Neither Winston Churchill nor radar pioneer Robert Watson-Watt initially agreed with this tactic for the mission. However, Tizard first arranged for Archibald Hill, another scientific member of the committee, to travel to Washington to explore the possibilities. Hill`s relationship to Tizard was optimistic. The resulting agreement triggered unprecedented cooperation between science and technology between the three nations. In 1940, Britain was overwhelmed by the growing power of German Nazi forces, faced with nightly attacks by the air force and a rapid decline in resources. On the advice of Sir Henry Tizard , a scientist who had played a crucial role in the creation of Britain`s first radar defence system in the 1930s, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill tasked a small task force of civilian and military scientists to travel to the United States to facilitate technological exchanges between the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada. Churchill and Tizard hoped that sharing the hollow magnet – a vacuum tube that produces radar microwaves small enough to fit into an aircraft – would encourage agreement for its large-scale production on U.S. soil.

But the greatest treasure of all was the prototype of a piece of material called Hollow Magnettone, which had been invented a few months earlier by two scientists in Birmingham. [7] Tizard`s team gathered in Washington on September 12 with their precious cargo safely. Tizard had already spent nearly three weeks setting up the mission`s headquarters at the Shoreham Hotel, near the British Embassy. Mission headquarters worked very similarly to an office, with a team of two secretaries sent by the National Research Council of Canada and office hours between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. [10] This seems like a pretty striking arrangement for a top secret mission, but exactly the same team members would meet there every morning for a briefing. At the height of the Second World War, an unlikely group of scientific heroes travelled from Britain to the United States via Canada and clung to Britain`s most precious war secret: the hollow magnettone. This mission, now known as the Tizard Mission, began with the simple purpose of mass producing hollow magnettone, the nuclear technology of microwave radars, on American soil. But more importantly, it served as a catalyst to end the war and begin lasting international cooperation between the United States, Britain and Canada. It also led directly to the creation of the famous Rad Lab at MIT, as well as the birth of MIT as a large state-supported research university. Although the Tizard`s mission was hailed as a success, especially on the radar, it is perhaps significant that upon his return to London on 8 October 1940, Tizard found that his work no longer existed. In 1940, the rector of Imperial, Sir Henry Tizard, led a team of scientists and engineers across the Atlantic to launch one of the most important missions of the Second World War.

But this time gave Tizard a huge advantage: he sent an attaché to get a copy of a top secret document called Frisch Peierls-Memorandum, written just a month before the attack on Germany.

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Tizard Agreement

by Loretta Prieto time to read: 2 min
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