Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement

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U.S. agricultural exports benefiting from the agreement include beef and pork products, wheat, corn, soybeans and cotton. [6] The agreement would provide immediate duty-free access to export categories that are most important to the U.S. beef industry, such as the USDA Prime and beef choice reductions. [6] All other tariffs on beef would be abolished and the final duties abolished within 15 years. [6] Colombian tariffs on pork products between 20 and 30% would expire at zero within 5 to 15 years. [6] The U.S. International Trade Commission estimates that the fully implemented agreement would increase U.S. beef exports to Colombia by 46 percent and pork exports by 72 percent. [6] Colombian tariffs of 5 to 20 per cent on wheat and soybeans would be immediately abolished; with a 25% corn tariff that must be sold on 12-year-old maize.

[6] The agreement would immediately remove the 10% obligation on U.S. cotton after adoption. Aspects of the copyright agreement are expected to be implemented in Colombia Bill No. 201 of 2012. [10] On 18 November 2003, the USTR informed the US Congress of the government`s intention to begin free trade negotiations with Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, all of which are beneficiaries of the Air Preferences Act (ATPA). Negotiations were scheduled to begin in the second quarter of 2004 and begin with Colombia and Peru. Once implemented, the agreement would eliminate tariffs on 80% of U.S. exports of consumer goods and industrial products to Colombia. 7% of U.S. exports would be processed duty-free within five years of implementation. The remaining tariffs would be abolished ten years after they were implemented.

Colombia will join the World Trade Organization (WTO) Information Technology Agreement (ITA), which would remove barriers to trade between Colombia and computer products. [1] (Note: This html version of the agreements was created by SICE. You will find a PDF version here) The agreement was subsequently subject to a constitutional judicial review, in accordance with Colombian regulations. The agreement was deemed in accordance with the Colombian Constitution by the Colombian Constitutional Court in July 2008. [9] On June 28, 2007, the United States and Colombia reached an agreement amending the U.S.-Colombia trade agreement. These amendments were negotiated to reflect the multi-party trade agreement reached on May 10, 2007 in the U.S. Congress. The Colombian Senate approved the amendments on 30 October 2007.

The Colombian President approved the amendments to the free trade agreement between the United States and Colombia on November 22, 2007, after the renegotiation of parts of the agreement, which was adopted by the House of Representatives 262-167 and the Senate 66-33. A trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program was also included in the bill. [13] [14] In agriculture, the agreement would immediately grant duty-free treatment to certain agricultural products from both countries, including high-quality beef, cotton, wheat and soybean flours. Other products that would be immediately treated as duty-free are important fruits and vegetables, including apples, pears, peaches and cherries, as well as many processed foods, including frozen fries and cookies. Other products would benefit from better market access; These include pork, beef, maize, poultry, rice, fruits and vegetables, processed products and dairy products. The United States and Colombia have worked together to remove health and plant health barriers to trade in the agricultural sector, including procedures for controlling the food security of beef, pork and poultry. These obligations are reportedly written in two separate letters on health and plant health measures, which should be attached to the free trade agreement. [1] President Obama has asked the U.S.

Trade Representative`s Office to address the issues

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Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement

by Loretta Prieto time to read: 2 min
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